SEO Best practices

Since my work revolves around creating pages that have high SEO quality, I have come across a few best practices to keep in mind.

  • Title tags: Keep these fairly keyword oriented, but also unique. It helps to keep your pages separate from one another, and is always good practice for indexing.
  • Meta/description The description should mention the keywords a bit, but don't stuff it. Put a nice sentence or two that talks about the relevant page. Note that you can put in the keyword meta tag as well, but over the years that has become less important
  • Canonical Link tag This refers to using the <link /> tag to keep a page that may have multiple URLs indexed appropriately. For instance you might be sending traffic to the page through pay per click ads, and these often pass parameters. Just set the link tag to whatever the URL of the page is. So if you have http://mydomain.com/mypage, you would have it as: <link rel="canonical" href="http://mydomain.com/mypage" />
  • H1, H2, H3, etc tags. Again keep these keyword relevant, but also relevant to the paragraphs that follow. With the exception of HTML 5 you should only have one H1 tag on your page.
  • Images With images, it's good practice to supply a value in the alt attribute that describes the image. Another thing to do is use either Photoshop or Gimp to optimize the image. If you find an image is lagging behind with the page loading, try reducing it's file size.
  • Sitemaps Creating an xml sitemap is a great way to tell the search engines what the URLs are for all your pages. Simply create one and then submit it to Webmaster Central. There's a lot of detail on how to create these properly on wikipedia.

There are always other little things you can do as well. Such as minimizing inline CSS rules as much as possible, using rel="nofollow" on links to pages that you do not need indexed. Setup a robots.txt file to point to your sitemaps. The wikipedia article I linked above has information about the robots.txt

Since my work revolves around creating pages that have high SEO quality, I have come across a few best practices to keep in mind.

  • Title tags: Keep these fairly keyword oriented, but also unique. It helps to keep your pages separate from one another, and is always good practice for indexing.
  • Meta/description The description should mention the keywords a bit, but don't stuff it. Put a nice sentence or two that talks about the relevant page. Note that you can put in the keyword meta tag as well, but over the years that has become less important
  • Canonical Link tag This refers to using the <link /> tag to keep a page that may have multiple URLs indexed appropriately. For instance you might be sending traffic to the page through pay per click ads, and these often pass parameters. Just set the link tag to whatever the URL of the page is. So if you have http://mydomain.com/mypage, you would have it as: <link rel="canonical" href="http://mydomain.com/mypage" />
  • H1, H2, H3, etc tags. Again keep these keyword relevant, but also relevant to the paragraphs that follow. With the exception of HTML 5 you should only have one H1 tag on your page.
  • Images With images, it's good practice to supply a value in the alt attribute that describes the image. Another thing to do is use either Photoshop or Gimp to optimize the image. If you find an image is lagging behind with the page loading, try reducing it's file size.
  • Sitemaps Creating an xml sitemap is a great way to tell the search engines what the URLs are for all your pages. Simply create one and then submit it to Webmaster Central. There's a lot of detail on how to create these properly on wikipedia.

There are always other little things you can do as well. Such as minimizing inline CSS rules as much as possible, using rel="nofollow" on links to pages that you do not need indexed. Setup a robots.txt file to point to your sitemaps. The wikipedia article I linked above has information about the robots.txt